Flying the flag

The current trend to move production for many products back into the UK (up to 25% of bosses have made this move according to to a new poll by the small business network Enterprise Nation) and proudly brand them with the Made In Britain claim is increasingly providing valuable kudos for brands both at home in the UK, but also for a rapidly growing audience across the globe.

For brands such as Fortnum & Mason, (recently redesigned by DECIDE.) who are perceived as quintessentially English, sales are increasing faster than ever before.  And for smaller companies such as Libby London who specialises in stylish office wear and uniforms sold in pop-up shops and online from its base in Battersea, southwest London, being ‘Made In Britain’ has brought a welcome sales boost. In fact, half its revenues, which have grown by 100% annually since the company was established four years ago, now come from clients who want uniforms made in the UK.

And movies are no different. At a politically challenging time on the world stage, patriotism is  a strong force within the United States. Clint Eastwood’s ‘American Sniper’ (which has attracted decidedly mixed critical reviews), took an impressive $105m over the Martin Luther King long weekend. But it’s not only a recent phenomenon – between the birth of cinema in 1896  and 1970, 191 of the country’s films had the word ‘American’ in the title, while a further 63 featured ‘America’. More recent movies, including American Graphiti (originally going to be called Another Quiet Night in Modesto), American Beauty, American Hustle and even the American Pie franchise (originally going to be titled East Great Falls High before deciding to pay homage to the singer Don McClean) have followed the trend. In each case the associations relating to the ‘American’ descriptor are radically different in what they wish to communicate, and the audience they wish to attract, but they all trade on the power of the country’s brand.

What opportunities are there for your brand to leverage the provenance, and value, of national identity?

Posted by

Grant Marshall

Date

29th January 2015

Categories

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